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20131202
20131210
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CSPAN 8
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Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)
in is that it is difficult. when you look at the deficit we have had, when you look at sequestration, it is obvious that we will be building smaller budgets. you do not see that reflected frequently in congress. we are still arguing to make sure we do not cut these things. when the pentagon says they're decommission it, people say you cannot do that. the battle over the size of the national guard. congress has got to wake up and understand the budgets are getting smaller. intelligentome decisions and scissor trying to defend every little piece of the budget. i think the pentagon tried to take a holistic approach. i hope they start to be more cooperative. we can make sure that we have the training equipment necessary for the military. >> this budget that will be dropping is probably going to be the first one we have seen that will confirm with the caps we have seen in the budget control act. smith were the secretary of defense, where would the cuts most heavily fall? we were talking about compensation and benefits. this will not go until may or june. this probably will not reform the alteration bills. make
administrations have danced around the mission of our infrastructure deficit. for all the attention to the various fiscal cliffs, the looming infrastructure deficit is every bit as critical. for two centuries, infrastructure was a bipartisan issue, from lincoln with the transcontinental railroad to democrats and republicans coming together to launch the interstate freeway system, signed into law by president eisenhower, subsequent roads, transit and water investments helped fuel our economy and tie the nation together. more recently, the failure to address long-term funding has also been bipartisan. the bush administration ignored strong recommendations from their own private sector experts that they impaneled to give advice. although the obama administration did request and employ some modest funding in the recovery act and has proposed an infrastructure bank and talked extensively and i think sincerely about the need for investment, what has been lacking has been a specific concrete proposal from either party to address infrastructure financing in america. while the political maneuvering has sec
's first democratic governor in 20 years. he faced the largest per capita deficit in the country. total debt of about three point $5 billion. he did several terms as mayor of stamford, connecticut, promising to make 2012 the year of education. in connecticut, he tackled a reform agenda in a state that has long been known for one of the nation's widest racial achievement gaps. the governor took the lead in passing one of the nations more dramatic education bills. it was public act -- some of the packages required a new teacher evaluation pilot in which 45% will be based on student learning. the governor's package created a commissioners network similar to the recovery school district. it has the ability to take authority over 25 of the state's lowest performing schools. an increased charter school funding. the figure will go to 11,500 by fiscal 2015. >> it is great to be with you. i appreciate the opportunity to speak about an issue that is very dear to my heart. i like to talk about what really needs to happen in the united states and put it into an appropriate context. we have been at
manning and the broncos erased a deficit. manning threw for five touchdowns. four to eric decker. they win 35-28. >>> steph curry hit two free throws late to give the warriors the lead but the kings had the last shot. >> isaiah thomas playing beat the clock. thomas to the rim, andrew bogut blocks the shot! he got the rebound, warriors win! [ applause and cheers ] >> andrew bogut came through with the big block. and the warriors win it, 115- 113. warriors starting to get the momentum back, just wait until they get andre iguodala back in the line-up. that will do it. everybody, have a great day. >>> thank you, vern. play of the day from the broncos-chiefs matchup. denver's running back.... knowshon moreno... stole the show with some denver runningback moreno stole the show with interesting moments. first he cried during the national anthem just gushing out then the crawl comes after he was finally brought down by what seemed like the entire kansas city defensive line. and there he goes. doing the worm out there. moreno's moment today's play of the day. the broncos won, too. >> they did win.
's infrastructure deficit. roads, bridges, transit systems are all increasingly at risk. we are facing an inadequate state of repair, construction of new facilities are on hold and we are losing ground in meeting our own needs, let alone the challenges of global competition. yet, this challenge is an opportunity for some potential progress. we know what to do to meet this challenge. we can write a new transportation bill that will meet today's needs. it just needs more money. there is a vast coalition that supports additional resources for infrastructure. the so-called special interests that are so often at odds are remarkably aligned when it comes time to recognize and fix this problem. business, labor, professional groups, local government, environmentalists, truckers, bicyclists all agree. the paralysis that surrounds questions of raising taxes does not necessarily need to apply in this case. ronald reagan, after all, was willing to sign into law a five cent gasoline tax increase 31 years ago when a nickel a gallon was real money. a user fee is in fact a different category from a general tax incr
to suggest that budget deficits are created by the poor. you know, you mentioned walmart and others who pay a sub minimum wage, essentially, the minimum wage isn't worth what it was in 1968. and they get -- that cost us $7 billion in just food stamps alone, because those people don't have enough money to stay out of poverty. they're against increasing the minimum wage, and they're against these people having enough money for food and their family. they know the fact that most of the studies show that most -- so many people on food stamps run out of food. the third week of the month. that when they have the money for food, et cetera $1.40 per person, per meal. they know how difficult it is for them to have the necessity. but that's not their political agenda. their political agenda is to demonize it. that's why they fight back so hard when the pope suggests that we should appeal to our better humanity, and care for these people and be concerned about these people. and try to get them up on their feet and get them proddive in society and provide the mechanisms to do that. that's what the pope
. caller: good morning, america. in 2008, obama came in. a budget deficit. $9.6 trillion deficit. in, america hired democrat congress, senate, president. they stuffed obama down our throats without any consent from republicans. here we are $17 trillion in debt. benghazi, mexico. people whove the believesnd what obama -- shutting down businesses. these democrats have done enough. harry reid has not passed a budget in this country in six years. where is the outrage there? we have no budget. where's the outrage? we are a country with no budget. you run your household with no budget? they are stealing the money to go back to the campaigns, to a democrats. wake up and look at the democrats -- facts. this guy's a socialist and that is what will be coming. god bless us all. host: former president bill clinton weighed in on the health care law i while ago, saying that the president should keep his pledge on if you like your you -- insurance you should keep it. was interviewed yesterday and asked about why he made those comments. [video clip] is it because you are setting the way for mrs. cli
this thing with take off area >> i think there has been a huge miss focus .n the budget deficit it is really a long-term problem. the key thing you want to do right now is get the economy back on its feet and coming along. you are actually slowing that recovery down. i think it is just misguided policy. we do not expect that to last forever. we are also saying state and local government coming back a little bit more. that may offset the track we're going to get. >> you just mentioned that modesty oh moderate phrase. as you mentioned, the last four days books contain that wording. should we read anything into that? what does it say about the growth expectations going forward? >> we have seen the fed consistently lower their projections. they have been more realistic. anticipating that growth will pick up, the key issue for the fed, and particularly with a new fed chair coming in, janet yellen is going to be preoccupied in this guiding -- and deciding when to taper and how rapidly to taper. more important like, how to communicate detentions to the markets. landly, the asset purchase cannot go
. in the long run, what we save shows up as higher paychecks for workers and lower deficits for the government. indeed, the cbo estimates in the second decade, once the aca is in effect it will shave 0.5% gdp off the deficit every year. that's about $80 billion each year in today's economy. the new york times reports this morning that the cost of the aca is headed in the other direction. economic benefits are going up and costs are going down. how do we implement all these benefits to make sure it translates into better care for every american? a lot of the benefits are in place, as i said, americans had been benefiting since 2010 but what we have to do is keep spreading the word so americans know these options are available to them. for americans without insurance, we are working to help get them covered and this is where much of the attention has been since october 1. the new health insurance marketplace will help insure millions of hard-working americans find affordable health care. in states where they are working to make this law work for more of their federal citizens, people are signing
a quick list. the adp private jobs boomed. 215,000. the trade deficit narrowed. new home sales were gangbusters. the ism services, little soft but still pretty good in the mid 50s. the fed beige book, pretty darn good. i'm not counting today's little -- this little three or four day thing, it's not a real question. why isn't good news good news? you look at these numbers and you could say to yourself, the economy is getting better. >> yeah, i think that in the end will be good news for the market, larry. in the meantime i think the market's saying, okay, if the news is good, maybe the fed tapers sooner rather than later. i'm not sure i like that so much. that's one explanation. i think another is, hey wait a minute, we're up a double digit percentage. we're up a lot in a short amount of time. we're discounting some good news. i'm tired. i'm going to take a rest. i think that's a bit what's going on here. >> protect your gains, that's what you're saying. >> here here. >> let me ask you this. okay. so you're janet yellen. you're going to be janet yellen tonight. you're coming in. i kn
were to continue, would lead to greater federal deficit, which would eventually reduce the nation's output in income, slightly what would occur under current law. so i believe we should be focused on how we get folks back to work. that is where the house has been focused. unfortunately, after 140-some bills we passed over to the senate, they still await even consideration at all by that body. so with that, mr. speaker, i yield back. mr. hoyer: i thank the gentleman for his comment. we need to have the -- we don't have the time nor the inclination of going through the bills which the gentleman refers as jobs bills. of course we have an alternative and mr. van hollen will be talking about that in terms of jobs, investment, infrastructure, investment in education and growing jobs for our people. but the fact of the matter is, mr. speaker, there are 1.3 million people who can't find a job. to say that they will be disincentivized because we continue to give them some support so they can survive and their families can survive during the period of time that they're looking for a job, th
group of symptoms which we call the the cognitiveoms, deficits. those are problems with memory and problems of attention. sadly, we do not have good treatments for those latter two categories. we have treatments for hallucinations and delusions, medications at work quite well. but the other parts of this syndrome, the parts that are often even more disabling, we need to come up with much better treatments. that is part of why nih is so focused on developing both better diagnostics and better therapeutics for these kinds of illnesses. host: this tweet on the issue of mental health -- are there any other significant development being made in other countries? guest: it is a great question. recently, mental disorder research has become global. there is a lot of interest in global mental health, and that is not just from europe and australia. canada and increasingly in other parts of the world. the disorders we're talking about our global and not unique to the developed world. as a result, there have been some very interesting little-resource environments to try to figure out how to
Search Results 0 to 13 of about 14 (some duplicates have been removed)